Volunteer Roles

“The theatre is the only institution in the world which has been dying for 400 years and has never succumbed. It requires tough and devoted people to keep it alive.” ~ John Steinbeck

Welcome to TAG. It takes dozens of volunteers with passion and dedication to ensure a successful theatre production. Explore the many volunteer roles open to you at TAG.

Click a role listed below to view a detailed description.

Volunteer Form

“Act as if it were impossible to fail.”  Dorothea Brande

TAG is well known for engaging a wide variety of actors, from professionally trained to people who have never acted before but have been bitten by the bug. If it's something you'd like to try, take a chance and audition, which is how a lot of people get started in community theatre! Some of the things you may find yourself doing:

  • Attend audition
  • Read script for first read-through with cast and crew
  • Attend a 'teaching tour' of the theatre that explains safety procedures
  • Attend all rehearsals (as determined by the Stage Manager)
  • Learn lines as quickly as possible to be off book
  • Make the character your own by bringing your own ideas/thoughts about the character forward, while remembering that the Director has the final say.
  • Learn the blocking as it develops
  • Be attentive and flexible during rehearsals to the Director’s vision
  • Provide a bio by the deadline provided for the program
  • Be available to Costume Designer as needed
  • Be available for photo shoots for the lobby display and, on occasion, with press photographers
  • Collaborate with Props person regarding your personal props
  • Attend technical rehearsal and cue-to-cue and be attentive to the purpose of the day
  • Provide your own makeup (specialized stage makeup not usually necessary) and be prepared to do your own hair/makeup unless the show calls for otherwise
  • Arrive at call time (generally one hour before performance) during the run of the play
  • Provide or arrange for your transportation to the theatre
  • Give it your all and don’t get sick!
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: High

Other Information: You may not be required to attend all rehearsals – e.g., if a scene is being rehearsed that you are not in. However, dedication to the show and the rehearsal schedule is a must. TAG often has smaller roles that are perfect for new actors, so please don't be shy to audition, we love seeing new people treading our boards!

Stage Crew - A group of individuals who spend their evenings coping with 20-minute stretches of total boredom interspersed with 30-second bursts of chaotic panic that may or may not involve fire, pantyhose and snakes.

If you've ever wondered what goes on back stage and who's in charge, well the answer is “A lot, and the ASM has it all under control!” The ASM is on a headset, communicating with the SM (Stage Manager) who is up in the lighting booth watching and calling the show. The ASM cues the actors, helps with props and costumes and makes sure the show runs smoothly. Some of the things you may find yourself doing:

  • Attend rehearsals
  • Help SM with blocking notes

    Help set up and clean-up of set and props

    Take Director's notes

    Call lines for SM when actors are off book

  • Work with props person to be informed on prop prepping for each performance
  • Act as liaison between cast and SM during final rehearsals and performance
  • Attend every performance and be in charge of backstage
  • Double check that stage/props/actors are ready for each performance
  • Remain backstage during performance to cue actors and handle props
  • Complete onstage set/scene changes during performance if needed
  • Communicate with SM in booth (via headset) re: cues/actors standing by
  • Cleanup backstage/props/stage (with SM) after each performance to be ready for the next one
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: High

Other Information: A great job for someone who is efficient and organized. Also, great for someone new to the theatre and looking to get their feet wet.

andycappWhat a great way to get to know the theatre, our volunteers and our patrons! You can volunteer for one night or 10 nights, that's entirely up to you. You are always paired up with another bar volunteer, as well as a Front of House Manager who deals with any issues a patron may have, so you get to have fun, chat with our guests and watch the show, provided you've booked a ticket! Some of the things you may find yourself doing:

  • Arrive 75 minutes before show time to get the lobby ready for our patrons
  • Read the Bar Staff Checklist at the bar to remind you of your duties
  • Check bar stock and refill from stock room if necessary
  • Count float
  • Help tidy the lobby
  • Serve patrons according to Liquor License rules (provided by TAG)
  • Stay for one round at the end of the show
  • Collect tickets – check date and time
  • Restock bar at end of performance
  • Count float and tidy up
  • Bar staff can watch the show on the same night they work the bar if they have a ticket
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: Low

“Ask not what your theatre can do for you, but what you can do for your theatre!” John F. Kennedy, Building Manager

These activities can vary from the mundane to the monumental, from weekly tweaks to the regular upkeep of the Playhouse, from minor construction to major additions and structural changes to the building and grounds. Most work is light in nature but heavy lifting is sometimes required. As of 2017, the “Wednesday Crew”** meets each week to assess the current state of the theatre and perform a variety of maintenance tasks that can include:

  • Identifying and replacing burned-out lights
  • Repair and replacement of batteries in emergency lights
  • Drinking tea and eating the recent offering of scones and sweets
  • Sweeping the yard of debris in the summer, of leaves in the fall and keeping the entrances/exits and paths around the building free of ice and snow in the winter months
  • Emptying garbage receptacles throughout the building and collecting recyclables for removal
  • Fixing faulty door handles
  • Washing and repainting the floor of the auditorium and stage area between productions
  • Touch-up painting
  • Drinking tea and eating the recent offering of scones and sweets
  • Simple repairs to floodlights
  • Organization of tools and set construction lumber
  • Assisting with set construction and maintenance of lights for shows
  • Vacuuming carpeted areas
  • Defrosting fridges
  • Plumbing repairs
  • Drinking tea and eating the recent offering of scones and sweets Et cetera, et cetera

**This group meets regularly on Wednesdays because the majority of its members are retired. We could accommodate non-retirees who would prefer to volunteer at weekends.

Time Commitment: Low to Medium

Other Information: More major undertakings can include careful demolition of old structures prior to rebuilding; assisting with simple frame construction, plumbing and wiring; installing fans and light fixtures and the painting of new interior walls.

You will assist the Costume Designer or Coordinator in sourcing, possibly making and fitting the clothing and accessories that will support the actors and the story, in order to make the script come to life! Some of the things you may find yourself doing:

  • Read script
  • Meet with Costume Designer/Coordinator to determine needs
  • Assist with measuring the cast
  • Assist with creation of a list of items to be pulled from costume stock or borrowed
  • Attend Production meetings and provide updates if asked
  • Attend fittings for cast members (may be multiple fittings)
  • Assist with alterations
  • Attend costume parade for SM when actors are off book; for final Director approval
  • During the run, be available for laundry and repairs/alterations. You may be asked to participate as a dresser if the production requires
  • After the run, assist in cleaning and returning the costumes to where they came from
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!
Time Commitment: Low to Medium

You will create the look of each character by choosing and sourcing their clothing and accessories. The costumes support the actors and the story, while contributing to the mood desired by the Director. Costumes may refer to the style of dress particular to a nation, a social class, or a period. It is up to you to ensure that every actor who walks on to the stage looks the part and feels comfortable doing so. Some of the things you may find yourself doing:

(Designer/Coordinator)

  • Read script
  • Meet with Director to determine the 'look' of the production
  • Meet with the Set Designer and coordinate colours, etc., so that actors stand out (or not) as their character requires
  • With knowledge gained from these meetings, plan design for all characters – colour, fabric, trim, etc.
  • Get Director's approval on designs
  • Measure the cast

(Designer)

  • From measurements, create patterns from which costumes are to be made
  • Depending on the complexity of the script, create costume plot for each character
  • Assemble a sewing team, if needed, with its own schedule

(Coordinator)

  • Depending on the complexity of the script, create costume plot for each character
  • Create list of items to be pulled from costume stock, borrowed or sourced from discount stores/actors own clothing

(Designer/Coordinator)

  • Attend Production meetings and provide updates
  • Arrange fittings for cast members. (May be multiple fittings)
  • Hold costume parade for final Director approval; be prepared for changes or elimination
  • During the run, be available for laundry and repairs/alterations
  • Be prepared to act as a Dresser if the production requires
  • After the run, clean (laundry or dry clean) and return costumes to where they came from
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: Medium (Coordinator) to High (Designer)

“A musical is only as good as its director. The same can also be said for the CIA.” Martin Short

As a Director, you are the creative force who makes the vision in your head a reality for the audience to enjoy. This is done thanks to the collaboration you'll do with all of the other team members – cast and crew! Some of the things you will find yourself doing:

  • Find a play you love and read it many, many, many times. First for the story, then for the sub-plot, then for the characters, then for the staging….
  • Find a Producer and a Stage Manager(SM).  Discuss with the Producer the job of assembling the rest of the production team
  • Create a mental vision of set, sound, lights and costumes and then meet with the SM, Set, Sound, Light and Costume designers to ensure your vision is clear and that all team members are working towards it
  • Plan audition dates with Executive Producer as per the theatre's schedule
  • Prepare a synopsis of the play, as well as characters required for audition, with approximate ages and sex
  • Select excerpts from scripts for each character for audition
  • Work with Publicity Lead to promote audition through various media outlets
  • Hold auditions with Producer and SM to find your cast
  • Attend first read-through with cast and crew
  • Attend all rehearsals
  • Establish blocking for the actors
  • Provide effective feedback
  • Work with the design team to ensure they implement the vision you have for the set, lights, sounds and costumes
  • Be clear about your vision to cast and crew, especially the SM – the more they know, the better equipped they are to help you achieve it
  • Attend Production meetings and provide updates
  • Keep design/crew issues separate from the actors
  • Let go and let the actors/crew take over as the weeks pass
  • Pass the reins to the SM for dress rehearsal
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: High

Other Information: You do a lot of work before rehearsals even start, and then you attend every rehearsal (usually 3 hrs – 3 times a week). Once the show opens, you can relax and hand the show over to the Stage Manager.

"If All the world's a stage, then the tech crew must be Gods."

As a Lighting Board Operator you will run the lighting software during rehearsals and performances, following the cues given by the Stage Manager. You will sit in the technical booth with the Stage Manager and Sound Board Operator during the shows, so you will get to watch the show each night from the booth, which is an experience on its own! Some of the things you will find yourself doing:

  • Attend technical rehearsals (the last 1-3 weeks of rehearsal) after the Lighting Designer has completed the first stages of design so that you can become familiar with the show and cues
  • Complete a pre-show check each night to ensure all the lights are working, focused and coloured correctly
  • Change any bulbs or gels that are not working before a performance
  • Execute the lighting cues during the show as per cueing from the SM
  • Execute visual cues independently, such as a table lamp turning on and off
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: Low to Medium

Other Information: Some LBOs are very involved in all aspects of the lighting and others will simply fill in and operate the board during the show's run. You can help program the lighting board to the needs of the Lighting Designer if you are interested in being a Lighting Designer in the future. It is preferable to have only 1-2 people running the board during a show's run of three weeks.

"I always say, or have said in the past, that ninety-nine and forty-four-hundredths of the audience does not pay any attention to the lighting, but one hundred percent is affected by it." Jennifer Tipton

lightingAs a Lighting Designer, you will create and oversee the lighting for the production using Light Factory software on the computer at the theatre. You will contribute to setting the mood on stage by choosing lighting and colours that support the script and the actors to create a play that will engage our audiences. Some of the things you will find yourself doing:

  • Analyze the script/score while thinking of how lighting can support and aid it
  • Meet with Director and Design team (set, sound, costume) to coordinate vision and create the schedule
  • Attend a lot of rehearsals early on to check blocking and alter your plans
  • Attend Production Meetings and provide updates
  • Make a lighting plot by choosing which lights to use, where they need to be hung and pointed to achieve the desired effects and what colours need to be added
  • Attend light hang day – direct crew of technicians who hang, cable, focus and colour the lights
  • Meet with Director and SM to create and audit light cues
  • Program the lighting software to allow control of the lights and create the individual cues with the Director and SM
  • Modify the lights with any changes as rehearsals progress
  • Attend paper tech, cue-to-cue, as well as technical rehearsal (the last 1-3 weeks before opening) to adjust timing of cues and intensity of lights
  • Ensure the Lighting Board Operators (if that's not you) are trained and comfortable with the system. If the Lighting Designer is also the Operator for the run, attend all performances and run the lighting board/computer during the performance as per the Stage Manager's cues
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!
Time Commitment: Medium

An effective producer is invisible to the cast and the production organically happens, amid catastrophes, low budgets and hilarious deadlines. As the Theatrical Producer you oversee all aspects of mounting a TAG production! You are the Go-To person for the entire cast and crew, as you will manage the overall financial and managerial functions of the production. You gather the team who will turn the play into a performance that will WOW our patrons! Some of the things you will find yourself doing:

  • Follow TAG’s Production Operations Manual at all times. (Executive Producer will update Manual as required)
  • Ensure the Executive Producer and Treasurer have obtained the rights to the play
  • Meet with Director and Executive Producer to discuss rights, cue-to-cue, budget, crew requirements – following the Production Operations Manual to ensure everything is covered
  • Gather your crew (in consultation with Director) and Stage Manager (SM) with assistance from the Volunteer Coordinator
  • Delegate tasks (with a deadline!) to appropriate person in cooperation with the Director and Stage Manager
  • Prior to the auditions, arrange a planning meeting between the Director and various team members, i.e., Design Teams for the set, lights and sound, etc.
  • Be responsible for everything that happens off stage and for ensuring that all volunteer positions for the production are filled
  • Create Production schedule and ensure SM has made a Rehearsal Schedule
  • Work with the Director and SM to arrange for the auditions and ensure that they are adequately promoted
  • Schedule and chair Production meetings to ensure deadlines are being met (building the set, Publicity, Props…).  These happen weekly at first and less frequently as deadlines are met and things are in place
  • Prepare and supervise the budget – all expenses go through the Producer
  • Create the show's Lobby Display Board – find a photographer and schedule the photo session(s) with cast and crew, collaborate with photographer to get the pictures printed, complete the display with labeling and 'flair' for an attractive display for our patrons
  • Arrange for printing of the publicity sandwich boards, pick them up and place them in the designated areas
  • Set up the cleaning of the theatre for the show
  • Create and send invites to the Board Members for the dress rehearsal of the show
  • Arrange Closing Cast Party and attend with gusto!
  • Arrange the soft strike and hard strike of the set
  • Responsible for presenting the Producer’s Report to the TAG Board of Directors, usually one month after the show

Time Commitment: High

Other Information:You don't have to attend every rehearsal or performance, but it is a good idea to drop-in on rehearsals and talk with the Director and Stage Manager, in order to stay informed. You will likely have to respond to or send out emails 3-7 days/week during the production time period of about 3 months. You are responsible for the seamless running of the show, i.e. to ensure that the actors concentrate on their lines and do not become involved in the politics going on behind the scenes. The Producer has to pick up the gaps in the show e.g., if a volunteer is not pulling their weight or is missing their deadlines, it is up to the Producer to step in. Although it is not in the job description, it is also part of the Producer's role to ensure everyone gets to the theatre for rehearsals. This could mean that the Producer (if you have a car) picks up actors who do not have cars or sets up a pick up and drop off schedule with actors/crew members.

“There are 3 responses to a piece of design -  Yes, No and WOW! Wow is the one to aim for.”  Milton Glaser

You will be responsible for using your skills and talents in order to create a stunning and eye-pleasing Production Program that informs our patrons on everything we want them know about the production! (e.g. sample program) You will have to adhere to certain rights guidelines, but you will have creative freedom with the design that will be approved by the Director. Some of the things you will find yourself doing:

  • Work with the Director and Producer to determine content. The Program will include both mandatory and optional information
  • Adhere to Production Rights Agreement
  • Be aware of deadlines: cast/crew bios, ads, printer
  • Attend Production Meetings and provide updates
  • Coordinate with Poster Designer to obtain graphics
  • Ensure advertisers/sponsors are given the agreed upon size ad (coordinate with Treasurer and Producer)
  • Prepare and circulate draft, allowing time for corrections before going to print
  • Circulate final draft for approval
  • Consult with Producer on the amount of programs to print
  • Coordinate printing, pickup and delivery of programs with Producer and Printing Sponsor
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: Low

Other Information: You will be expected to attend production meetings at the theatre and in most cases, are welcome to sit in on rehearsals.  Typically, the work is done on your own time at home. The job takes approximately 10-15 hours, plus edits. The amount of time needed is highly dependent on your level of computer skills.

As a Prop lead or team member, you will be gathering and sourcing all of the items handled by the actors during a show, all within a budget provided to you by the Producer. Some of these props are already at TAG, however some will need to be bought or even made! This is a great role for someone who is new to the theatre and is resourceful and creative with arts and crafts. Most of the work is done on your own time, but you will need to attend a few rehearsals, and possibly all performances if needed. The time required is determined before you commit. Some of the things you may find yourself doing:

  • Read the play and make a list of props if one is not provided with the script. You will usually also receive a Props list from the Producer or Director if anything differs from the list in the back of the script
  • Consult with Director regarding changes or additions to the list
  • Attend rehearsals early on and consult with the Director to ensure you are getting the right color, material, period and size for each prop
  • Attend Production Meetings and provide updates
  • Collaborate with Costume Designer and Set Dresser regarding items that may overlap (purses, flowers…)
  • Check the theatre’s Prop storage area and gather as much as possible
  • Source the rest from cast/crew, or as cheaply as possible from stores (Dollar Store, Value Village…)
  • Some props will need to be made – consult with TAG’s gifted props crew if you need assistance
  • Ensure all props are approved by the Director, and that all actors are comfortable with each one (not slippery, too big, stiff to open...)
  • If consumables (cake, drinks, fake vomit!), ensure you purchase it as needed. Such items are called wet props
  • May need to attend every performance, depending on how prop-heavy the show is
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!
Time Commitment: Low to High

As a production's Publicist, you are responsible for publicizing the show through various mediums, reaching out to the media and the community. You will be given TAG’s Publicity Manual which is a great resource, plus you are encouraged to find and use new ways to reach a larger or different audience for TAG. This is a great role for a person who likes to be creative with writing and works well with deadlines. You also need to be a self-starter and open to text changes/suggestions. Some of the things you may find yourself doing:

  • Meet with TAG's Publicity Director to receive any instruction and information you will need.
  • Send media releases to media, working from a media list that will be provided to you in the Publicity Manual, along with samples of past media releases. The Publicity Director on TAG’s Board has the responsibility for keeping the manual/lists up-to-date
  • Ensure media releases are sent according to each media’s deadline
  • Arrange ticket giveaways with Producer
  • Invite appropriate media to the show (typically during opening week or dress rehearsal)
  • Social media – create Facebook page, manage Facebook and Twitter feeds along with TAG's Publicity Director
  • If applicable, arrange for a short video to be shot and edited for social media release. This can also be played on the screen in the theatre Lobby
  • Arrange photo shoots with media and cast/crew
  • Attend Production meetings and provide updates
  • Update Publicity Director on any changes to Media List
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: Medium

As a member of the Construction Team, you will build the set for the play that may include walls, furniture, mobile pieces, stairs, door frames, room entrances and more! You will do this under the guidance of the Set Designer, or designated construction lead, who could be you! Some of the things you may find yourself doing:

  • Consult with Set Designer and Director to understand the action in the play
  • Build as lightly as possible, but as sturdy as needed. Plan materials based on action on stage (Styrofoam vs. wood stairs)
  • Create a list of materials and budget for approval by Producer
  • Assemble flats to form walls, allowing for windows, doors and entrances
  • Build set and set pieces(s)
  • Attend Production Meetings and provide updates if asked
  • Consult with Set Dresser and Director regarding any safety, insecure, or sticky things (doors, stairs…) as rehearsals continue
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: Low to Medium

Other Information: You are part of a team for this and the work is usually done within 2-4 weeks, depending on how intricate the set design is. The work is started as soon as the previous show ends and the sooner the set is completed the better.

As Set Designer, your job is to design a set that reflects both the playwright's story as well as the Director's vision! The set should support the actors and the story and not be a distraction for the audience. Some of the things you will find yourself doing:

  • Read the script over and over
  • Consult with the Director to know their vision (He/She has the final say!)
  • Consult with the Technical Director, Lighting and Costume Designers

    Obtain stage dimensions and restrictions

    Discuss any potential logistical or technical challenges (space, lighting...)

    Ensure you are all on the same page and following the Director’s vision

  • Based on the script, determine the locations needed and if any set pieces have to appear and be removed (beds, trees…)
  • Decide on a Presentational (non-realistic) or a Representational (realistic) approach
  • Attend Production meetings and provide updates
  • Present initial concept to the Director (via model or drawing) and refine it to incorporate the Director's input
  • Determine with the Producer whether you or a designated construction person will take the lead to supervise the volunteers who will build the set
  • If you are not the lead, provide sufficient drawings and on-site consultation to the Lead to ensure a smooth construction process. Continue to collaborate with them during the time the set is being built
  • Consult with the Set Dresser to begin procurement of pieces needed for the set and to establish a colour palette with them and the Set Painter
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: Low to Medium

Other Information: Your time is required during the pre- and early rehearsal stages.  Most sets are completed 50% – 75% of the way through rehearsals.

You get to play interior decorator and put life, character and mood into a set! Choose from TAG's prop/set inventory or go nuts at one of Halifax's used goods stores! Some of the things you may find yourself doing:

  • Collaborate with Director and Set Designer to ensure you know their vision of the set
  • You may be a Team Lead or team member, so you may have to recruit assistants (with the Producer’s help)
  • Attend rehearsals to get an idea of the set and action on stage, as well as the mood and period of the play
  • Assist with painting of the set
  • Meet with Props Person to make sure there is no overlap of purchasing, and to see if a prop needs a place to be put on the set (e.g., the actor’s coat needs a hook)
  • Procure dressings while adhering to a budget (via Producer). This includes furniture, curtains, pictures, décor and more
  • Place or hang all dressings on the stage with assistance if needed
  • Communicate with Set Builder if anything needs fixing/repair (e.g., a door doesn’t shut properly)
  • Ensure Director and Actors are comfortable with all furnishings
  • Attend later rehearsals once set is completed and actors are on the stage to troubleshoot any issues
  • Submit all expenses to the Producer as soon as possible
  • At end of show, assist in undressing the set, returning all borrowed props and placing all TAG props back near the props storage for proper re-placement
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: Low to Medium

“Painting is silent poetry and poetry is painting that speaks.”  Plutarch

Together with the Set Designer and a team of painters, you will put brush to wood and finally bring to life the set that has been created in the Set Designer’s mind. You may paint a wall one colour, splatter paint across the floor, detail a piece of furniture or create a mural of a magical land or more. Either way, you will paint, you will get messy, you may dance and you will have fun! Some of the things you may find yourself doing:

  • Act as team leader or team member. Team Lead may have to recruit helpers with help from Producer
  • Meet with Set Designer to ensure the correct paint colour is being used in the right places
  • Involves 1-3 sessions, depending on how much needs to be painted, however, some shows require 8-10 painting sessions!
  • Clean up set after each session as others will need to use the space for further building or rehearsals
  • Paint all walls and furniture as determined by Set Designer/Dresser
  • Decorative/artistic painting may be required
  • May need to pick up paint, but this is usually done by Set Designer or Producer
  • Clean up supplies and return them all to the painting cupboard backstage after each session
  • Be available for touch-ups or changes (lighting can affect the colour inadvertently)
  • Attend the Closing Party with gusto!
Time Commitment: Low to Medium

As a Sound Board Operator you will run the sound software (Show Cue System) during rehearsals and performances, as per the cues given by the Stage Manager. You will sit in the technical booth with the Stage Manager and Lighting Board Operator during the shows. You will get to watch the show each night from the booth, which is an experience on its own! Some of the things you will find yourself doing:

  • Attend technical rehearsal (the last 1-3 weeks of rehearsal) after the Sound Designer has completed the first stages of design so that you can become familiar with the show and cues
  • Complete a pre-show check before each performance to ensure all the audio systems are working properly – allow time to correct any problems
  • Execute the cues during the show as per cueing from the SM
  • Execute visual cues independently - such as door slamming or phones ringing
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: Low to Medium

Other Information: You can be as involved as you wish during the rehearsal process. You can even help program the sound board to the needs of the Sound Designer if you are interested in being a Sound Designer in the future. Alternatively, you may simply run the board during the performance. It is preferable to have only 1-2 people running the board during a show's run of three weeks.

As the Sound Designer you help to set the mood for the show! You choose the music the audience hears before the show starts and every tune or sound effect heard during the show and scene changes. This is a great job for someone who has a love of music and atmosphere! If the show is a musical, there will be a Music Director who may need assistance from the Sound Designer to amplify instruments or source/provide sound effects not created by the onstage musicians. You will use the Show Cue System (SCS) software to program the sound for the operators to use.

  • Analyze the script or score with a view of how sound can support and aid the production
  • Meet with the Director and other Designers (set, lights, costumes) to coordinate vision and create the schedule
  • Attend rehearsals to see how blocking and action can influence the sound beyond the script
  • Attend Production Meetings and provide updates
  • Research as necessary for period and appropriateness of music and sounds
  • Source all sound effects and music
  • Coordinate any placing of speakers that may be necessary
  • Meet with Director and SM to create and audit sound cues
  • Create sound plot and program SCS on the audio CD
  • Attend paper tech, cue-to-cue, as well as technical rehearsals (the last 1-3 weeks before opening) to adjust timing, fade and volume levels
  • Ensure the sound board operators (if that's not you) are trained and comfortable with the system. If the Sound Designer is also the Operator for the run, attend all performances and run the sound board/computer during the performance as per Stage Manager's cues.
  • Attend Closing Party with gusto!

Time Commitment: Medium

“How many Stage Managers does it take to screw in a … done.”

stage manager

A prior knowledge of the technical/management aspect of productions would be an asset. There are opportunities for first-time stage mangers to be mentored/trained. Some of the things you may find yourself doing:

  • Read script and attend/manage auditions
  • Attend all rehearsals and Production Meetings
  • Collaborate with director to create rehearsal schedule

DURING REHEARSALS...

  • Set up/clean up ‘stage’
  • Ensure all props are in place
  • Prep wet props
  • Make note of blocking as Director and actors are determining it
  • Correct actors on any missed blocking or lines
  • Call lines when actors are off book
  • Keep cast to a schedule - set break times
  • Lock up any dangerous or valuable props
  • SM is usually first in and last out of building. Ensure theatre is kept tidy and hazard free. Ensure building is secure. Communicate any issues to the Producer and/or Building Manager.
  • Communicate to cast/crew re: changes to schedule/rehearsals
  • Communicate to Design team, Props and Costume Lead of changes or issues
  • Collaborate with Lighting and Sound Designers to determine cues
  • Attend paper tech
  • Attend Lighting and Sound level set sessions to establish cues
  • In charge of technical rehearsal and cue-to-cue

DURING THE RUN...

  • In charge of the show!
  • Ensure cast and crew have arrived, parked where they should and entered through the back door
  • Collaborate with Front of House Manager on start/end timing
  • Double check all actors, props and stage before each performance
  • Call cues for Lighting and Sound Board Operators
  • Communicate with Assistant Stage Manager (ASM) backstage, via headset
  • Attend to any issues that may arise
  • Clean up (with ASM) the stage, dishes…
  • Ensure security of building after each show
  • Help Producer with the coordination and completion of the soft strike on closing night
  • Attend closing party with gusto!
Time Commitment: High

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Volunteer Form

Buy Tickets

TAG tickets are sold through Ticket Atlantic:

  1. Pick up at any of the participating Atlantic Superstore outlets
  2. Charge by Phone at (902) 451-1221
  3. At the door (subject to availability - cash and cheque only)
  4. Online at www.ticketatlantic.com
  5. Ticket Atlantic Scotiabank Centre Box Office
  6. Self Serve Express Kiosks located in the Scotiabank Centre Box Office South Promenade and Casino Nova Scotia

Ticket FAQs

Current Season

Mark your calendars for TAG's current season.

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Parking Notice

Limited parking is available at the Pond Playhouse for our TAG audience.

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Join Us

Join TAG or Renew Your Membership Today!

Membership Benefits Include:

  • $3 discount off admission to all shows
  • five informative newsletters each year
  • special members-only events

Learn More

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